Trying To Make A Difference

131 notes

productivemuslim:

Note: ‘Istikhārah’ in Arabic means seeking guidance to make a decision concerning something.

SubḥānAllāh, Allāh is so Merciful to us! He knew that it would be hard for us to make decisions easily, so he opened a special lines of communication for us to Him when it comes to decisions…it’s called Istikhārah prayer!
Click to read the article ‘5 Steps to Make Effective Decisions’: http://proms.ly/1pcvd1I

May Allāh help all of us to master the art of effective decision making! Aameen!


Follow us: @AbuProductive on Twitter | ProductiveMuslim on Facebook

productivemuslim:

Note: ‘Istikhārah’ in Arabic means seeking guidance to make a decision concerning something.

SubḥānAllāh, Allāh is so Merciful to us! He knew that it would be hard for us to make decisions easily, so he opened a special lines of communication for us to Him when it comes to decisions…it’s called Istikhārah prayer!

Click to read the article ‘5 Steps to Make Effective Decisions’: http://proms.ly/1pcvd1I

May Allāh help all of us to master the art of effective decision making! Aameen!

Follow us: @AbuProductive on Twitter | ProductiveMuslim on Facebook

12,205 notes

humansofnewyork:

"A few years ago, I got a call on my cell phone from a twelve year old child from my village. He was calling me from a bus stop. He’d taken a bus into the city alone, and he was calling me to ask if I could help him find a way to go to school. Both of his parents had died of AIDS, and he had no money for tuition. I told him to stay where he was, and left work immediately to pick him up. At first I was very mad at him. He should not have travelled alone. But then I looked at him and I saw myself. I’d also been desperate to go to school after my father was killed, but we had no money. So even though I was suffering myself, I told him I would try to help him. My salary was not enough, so I tried many things to get the money. After work, I went to the landfill to hunt for recyclables. But after I paid to have them cleaned, there was no money left. Now I’m trying to make bricks. I have a small operation in the village to make bricks, and I sell them in the city. It doesn’t make much money, but it’s enough to pay tuition for the boy and three of his siblings.” (Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"A few years ago, I got a call on my cell phone from a twelve year old child from my village. He was calling me from a bus stop. He’d taken a bus into the city alone, and he was calling me to ask if I could help him find a way to go to school. Both of his parents had died of AIDS, and he had no money for tuition. I told him to stay where he was, and left work immediately to pick him up. At first I was very mad at him. He should not have travelled alone. But then I looked at him and I saw myself. I’d also been desperate to go to school after my father was killed, but we had no money. So even though I was suffering myself, I told him I would try to help him. My salary was not enough, so I tried many things to get the money. After work, I went to the landfill to hunt for recyclables. But after I paid to have them cleaned, there was no money left. Now I’m trying to make bricks. I have a small operation in the village to make bricks, and I sell them in the city. It doesn’t make much money, but it’s enough to pay tuition for the boy and three of his siblings.” 

(Kampala, Uganda)